Article of the Week: Great Literature and Ethics
Article of the Week

Article of the Week: Great Literature and Ethics

Does reading great literature make us better human beings? Gregory Currie asks just this question in an essay posted yesterday on The Opinionator, the online commentary blog of The New York Times. In his essay, Currie defines great literature broadly as “challenging works of literary fiction” or “the classics” and better as “bright, socially competent … Continue reading

Article of the Week / Publishing Trends

Article of the Week: The Publishing World Yesterday and Today

This week, we return to a television program for article of the week. A family friend brought to my attention the International Summit of the Book held at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC on December 7, 2012. The day-and-a-half long summit was subsequently broadcast on C-Span 2 Book TV. Given that I do … Continue reading

Article of the Week

Article of the Week: Readers Share Memories of Special Holiday Books

Today I would like to turn your attention to a fantastic article from the Chicago Tribune‘s books section. Entitled “Memories that bind: Readers share the books that made their holidays glow,” the stories selected by the editors are all heartfelt and moving. Not only that, they show that often times the simplest of gifts–a good … Continue reading

Article of the Week

Article of the Week: How the Princess of Cleves Brought Down Sarkozy

This week’s article of the week comes, once again, from The New Yorker. Written by Elisabeth Zerofsky, “Of Presidents and Princesses” draws a direct correlation  between Nicolas Sarkozy‘s lost bid for re-election as French president and his stance on traditional French culture. More specifically,  his attacks on the French literary classic The Princess of Clèves … Continue reading

Article of the Week

Article of the Week: Big Reading, A Hike Through Dickens

This week’s article of the week is from The New Yorker. Written by Brad Leithauser, “Big Reading: A Hike Through Dickens” details one author’s personal journey as he reads his way through all of Dickens’s collected works. This is quite an extensive undertaking, as Dickens’s fiction titles total more than 9000 pages. Leithauser is witty, insightful, and … Continue reading